Pitt going D1?

http://video.insidelacrosse.com/video/view/awMesBYXMhpNJ2_60po_eA/who-should-add-di-lacrosse

Quint what are you talking about?

It’s certainly an exciting time for the growth of the game but here’s the problem for club lacrosse players. When and if schools like BYU, Michigan, Florida State and so forth go Division 1, everybody associated with the club program the year before is going to be on the chopping block. 

1. Club lacrosse players play club lacrosse for a reason. They aren’t as big, aren’t as fast, aren’t as strong, don’t have as good of a stick, don’t have as high of a lacrosse IQ as their NCAA lacrosse counterparts. Even at the highest levels of the MCLA, i.e. watching the Chapman Michigan title game on tv, the game is not played at the same speed of a D1 game or D3 game because the players aren’t as good. And that’s perfectly fine for club lacrosse because it fulfills the need of kids that want to play lacrosse but aren’t physically gifted and don’t want to practice 6 hours a day.

Here comes the problem. When a team of club lacrosse players makes the jump to the Division 1 level, kids on the roster that were “club” players by nature, might not be on the roster anymore. 

Remember the NCAA is a business. Coaches get fired if they don’t win. They can’t win without talented kids. Kids with no talent aren’t going to play and might not make it to the second half of the first day of practice. 

2. Club lacrosse coaches coach for a reason. And the reasons are the same as why the players play. They aren’t good enough to be coaches at the NCAA level. They don’t have the time to coach 5-6 days a week because they have a full time job. In fairness to a majority of coaches, their teams aren’t trying to make the leap to D1. What about the coaching staffs at Michigan and BYU? Is an athletic director going to be willing to retain a head coach with no Division 1 playing experience to lead their new NCAA program? Is an athletic director going to be willing to retain a head coach with no Division 1 recruiting experience to to lead their new NCAA program?

Then on the other hand loyalty becomes an issue. As an athletic director are you going to be willing to fire a head coach who helped get the club team ready to compete at the D1 level.

Again the NCAA is a business. Time will tell who makes the leap and who misses out on the very boat they built.

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